strength training

Not All Athletes Should Be Eating The Same

Not All Athletes Should Be Eating The Same

We’ve all heard the viral celebrity “diets” - think of Olympian Michael Phelps, who boasted of consuming upwards of 8,000 calories per day, Usain Bolt’s binge of Chicken McNuggets, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s fish and egg feasts, or the Los Angeles Lakers’ obsession with bone broth. If we blindly follow one of these high-profile “endorsed” diets, it’s completely likely we could find ourselves fatter, slower, and fatigued through our training and competitive seasons. But why could one diet work so well for one athlete and completely unravel another?

Progression: An Ode to White Pine

Progression: An Ode to White Pine

I first started with White Pine back in November. When you sign up, you go through an assessment to figure out where you’re weak and where you're strong. As a climber, I was primarily only concerned with a few areas, pulling strength being the main one. But since climbing is a full body sport

Why Strength Training is Essential for Weight Loss

Walk in to a gym on any given day, and I promise you will see at least one poor soul trudging along on some form of cardio equipment in a dire attempt to lose weight. That’s how it works, right? Do cardio, lose weight. Right?

Right.

…and wrong.

Why Athletes Need Mobility Training

As an athlete, I have trudged my way through many, many injuries: finger injuries, sprained ankles, broken bones, you name it… But, the injuries that were most common, and sadly the most preventable, were those due to my lack of mobility and flexibility: injuries such as hyperextensions, back issues, hip pain, and even minor muscle tweaks…All of these were due to my lack of mobility, not my lack of strength.